Freedom

NOW I KNOW HOW MY FREEDOM IS BEING TAKEN AWAY!

By Craig M. Watts

For a while now I’ve been hearing from some folks I know and who love tell me that “our freedoms are being taken away.” In particular they have insisted that the health care reform measures were stripping away freedom. I confess I wanted some different kinds of reforms. Still, I hadn’t noticed that any of my freedoms were missing. I certainly hadn’t felt less free. My behaviors weren’t being restricted in any ways that were new or unusual, so far as I could tell. Yet I didn’t doubt the sincerity of my friends, though they had a hard time explaining just how I was being deprived of my freedoms.

I didn’t worry about this too much because the Supreme Court was likely to declare the Obamacare unconstitutional. But that didn’t pan out.

Finally, I decided I should do a little research. After all, I sort of like freedom. I’d hate to lose it. So even though I hadn’t detected any missing freedom, I thought it wise to check, just in case. Here is some of what I discovered, among a long list of others disappearing freedoms.

  1. We are losing the freedom to have our employers burden us with higher and higher deductibles in order to increase their profits. Now deductibles can’t be higher than $2,000 for individuals and $4,000 for families. How oppressive!
  2. We are losing our freedom to have insurance that has no preventive care, something that may have been less costly in the short run but much more costly in the long run. But now I can make sure I’m healthy before I get sick and I don’t have the choice of just getting seriously ill without an opportunity to avoid it!
  3. We are being deprived of the freedom of having an employer provide insurance that won’t include my “slacker children” up to age 26. Surely, that is an onerous restriction of liberty!
  4. We are having the freedom stripped from us to have insurance companies raise the premiums we pay however much they want without a review by the Secretary of Health and Human Services who might disallow them if the increases are considered “unreasonable.”
  5. We are being cruelly deprived of the freedom of having an insurance company board or its stockholders give its CEO –whose average salary is about $30 million dollars a year- more than $500,000 in deferred compensation.

And there are still other ways in which we are being robbed of freedom by Obamacare. It is going to be next to impossible to get insurance that will not provide ambulatory patient services, emergency services, hospitalization, mental health and substance use disorder services, and prescription drugs. We are being deprived of the freedom of getting inadequate insurance, even if we really, really want it! And, worse, people who are less healthy or poorer than many of us are going to benefit and that is intolerable and ungodly.

Now that I know what is really going on, I feel overwhelmed with a sense of oppression. So many of my freedoms have been taken away I can hardly breathe! I am now virtually a slave and I didn’t even know it. Oh my! This calls for a revolution!

 

Craig is minister of Royal Palm Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), Coral Springs, Florida, Co-Moderator of Disciples Peace Fellowship and a brand new Granddad who is willing to show pictures of his amazing Grandson if you want to see a few.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time to take Christ out of Christmas?

Spending my second Advent and Christmas season in the South, I’m still a bit taken aback by Christmas.  I knew that there would be a perceived “War on Christmas” when I moved here.  I still don’t understand why saying Happy Holidays, which originally emerged as a shorter way of saying “Have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year” along with Season’s Greetings, and now is a way of including Merry Christmas, Happy New Year, Happy Hanukkah or Happy Kwanzaa or any other holiday (Yule or Solstice, anyone?) is such a bad thing to say.  I get that people are worried about Christmas being left out, but with all the lights, carols, and traditions, I don’t see that happening anytime soon.

But you probably know all that.  What surprised me most by moving here was the prevalence of Santa, shopping and, well, Christmas outside of Christ.  It’s not that much different than most of America, I suppose, but I was prepared for an anti-Santa and therefore anti-commercial Christmas.  But I found the opposite.   There is still much talk about needing Jesus but I hear more talk about shopping and Santa lists than I do about Christmas Eve services.

I took the above picture the March after we first moved here.  What I have come to realize is that the signs “Keep Christ in Christmas” which appear all over the billboards on the highway this time of year don’t really mean that.  What they mean is “Celebrate ONLY Christmas.”  And Christmas can include everything here from Santa to Yuletide, shopping and commercialization.

What does not seem to constitute Christmas is anything that takes away from the consumerist hold on the holiday.  Saying “Happy Holidays” does not imply a need to purchase a gift, whereas “Merry Christmas” does.  So therefore, school functions, parades, community events and businesses that use “Happy Holidays” instead of “Merry Christmas” are antithetical to the consumerist drive of the season.

I get that the word “Holiday” can be overused and misused.  Calling a Christmas Tree a “Holiday Tree” really makes no sense to me since trees are part of our European-American Christmas tradition from Germany.  Cookies that are shaped like trees, ornaments, bells and candy canes are clearly Christmas cookies and “Holiday cookies” is just an absurd generalization.  But overall, “Happy Holidays” should not cause the ruckus it seems to do every year.

I once heard a pastor say that it may be coming time to take Christ out of Christmas rather than keeping Christ in.  As much as we love the carols, “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” does not really correspond with “Joy to the World!”  Most of our traditions are related to midwinter festivals that took place even before Christ was born and were not associated with the celebration of Christ’s birth for hundreds of years.

At my previous church, we celebrated “Christmas in July.”  Often an attempt to boost slow summer sales by department stores, our “Christmas in July” was without the gift-giving list-making present-wrapping craze.  We sang the Christmas carols of Christ’s birth.  We celebrated suddenly, without preparation, as if Advent had happened every day and suddenly it was Christmas.

I don’t think we could ever get away from December 25th.  And I still love watching “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” and singing the silly songs of the season with my son.  But trying to connect it all with Christ is perhaps not necessary.  Maybe instead of trying to fit Jesus’ birth in by the Christmas tree and Santa coming down the chimney, we should consider a return to Epiphany celebrations, of Jesus’ manifestation to the world—away from the commercialization and craze.   Then instead of worrying about saying “Merry Christmas” or “Happy Holidays,” we can say, “Happy Epiphany!” and not worry about the confusion with the commercial world, whose sales are done by then.

We really should not be threatened by “Happy Holidays.”  There are many who celebrate Christmas who aren’t Christian and don’t connect the date to the birth of Jesus anyway.  But I sense that in general, there is a deeper desire to get away from the commercialization and get back to celebrating a season of peace and charity, goodwill and celebration.  This more general seasonal, communal feeling is not necessitated by sales and shopping.

Perhaps it is time to take Christ out of Christmas, or at least take away the connection of Christ to consumption.  I think Jesus would be far less concerned with us saying “Happy Holidays” than our Christian acceptance of consumerism tied to the celebration of His birth.  Rather, I think growing the celebration around peace, charity and hospitality for all people would be more in tune with the message of John 3:17 of Christ coming so that the world might be saved through Him, instead of condemning those who say “Happy Holidays.”

Kegger at Jesus'!

When I was in high school, I lived for someone's parents to leave and for the house party to go off. I was part of that group that played the music or threw the parties. I was not musically inclined outside of the random hardcore and punk groups I got to front. I was a really big fella. So, I got to bounce all the parties. When someone's parents were planning that weekend getaway, we were playing that weekend's kegger.

I get butterflies just writing about it now. So and so would inform someone that their parents were going out of town and that they would be left 'home alone!" That someone would call another person and soon the bands were organized, the kegs procured and the buzz spread. This was how our emerging suburban Los Angeles scene flowed.

That Friday after school we would show up to the "abandoned" house with sound equipment. We would set up and do a sort of silent sound check. Folks would arrive with the kegs (The funny part is that we used to buy Near Beer cause it was cheaper and we made more money from it. Nobody knew the difference.) The kegs would be iced and we would set a perimeter for security.

Then as evening approached the car loads of teenage boys and girls would park and walk up to the party. I would collect money from them and mark their hands with a marker. We could make a couple thousand of dollars from the five-buck admission we charged for Near Beer and "decent" angry youth music. Every once and a while I would let a cute girl in, hoping that would better my chance of her thinking I was cool and I could ask her out.

The backyard would fill up. Every nook and cranny would be filled and they all awaited the stage to light up and the band to play. We were kings of our little fiefdom fueled by punk and hardcore, all of us looking for something to be angry about or someone to listen to our anger.

The band would take the stage and unleash a massive wave of shock and awe upon the Near Beer soaked crowd of kissy-faced teens and macho shirtless, mohawked man-boys. We would storm our anger in to the pit and smash each others faces as we fought the changing world around us. Gone was the safety of Big Wheels and comic books. This was the post-Reagan era in an area roughed up by cuts to the Military Industrial Complex. We knew a few of us had a future; we just were not sure of who those few were. Our dream was to graduate high school and maybe get a job at SEARS fixing washer and dryers. We might be considering college as a way to escape the uncertainty but tonight we had the "pit."

Then, just as we really started getting in to it and that cute girl I let in for free was going to give me her number the COPS showed up. A neighbor had called the police and demanded they break up the party. There was a mass exodus from the backyard. Sweaty mohawked teens jumped fences carrying their teenaged angst with them. The "drunken" teen girls sat dazed and confused, only to be pulled up by their friends and make a mad dash to the other door. The police, almost lovingly, flashed their flashlights on the exiting crowds making sure they dumped out the beers and walked home.

The band tried to pack up really quickly so their gear would not get confiscated. The someone whose house it was cried inside as they saw their social life waver. I was gone when we saw the police pull up and shouted out to the others, "POLICE!" We were already a block over before the mohawked kids jumped the fence.

The parents are called and the someone is reprimanded. That someone has the potential to be legend. The parental fears are stoked and they never go on another vacation again.

I fear that the church looks at the younger generations with this kind of dread. "If we leave, they will mess it all up." True, we are excited and do not look at the world with the same kind of eyes. We are uniquely ourselves. We have different values. We have different priorities. We have different dreams and hopes for our lives. We have different pressures and woes. We are different.

Almost 20 years later, if left with an empty house I am more likely to got to bed early than throw a kegger. My youth is fleeting. I am nearer to 40 than I am to 30. In my youthful sunset I hear "We need young families/young adults/youth in the church" a lot. It seems to be all over the church profiles out there.

Every church is looking for a 30-something pastor. He is white, tall with a nice build. He has a beautiful wife that studied music in college and they have three lovely, well behaved children that angelically glide around church without a sound.

He is great with youth, can preach like Craddock, tell stories like Hemingway, is the best counselor, can fundraise blood from a turnip and will get butts in the seats to continue the ministry of the church just as it always has been.

The problem is that that guy no longer exists. No one can do everything.

There are countless folks out there searching for a place to serve. Every year we graduate another class of hopeful ministers in to a system with no room for them to serve. As the church wrestles with what to do many creative, young ministers leave ministry for "a job." They leave the church.

These are folks that our institutions have invested time, money and hope over a three to four year period. We have encouraged them to follow a discernment process towards a vocation that may or may not be able to embrace them. Our system is broken.

The brokenness of our church institutions and the slow moving process towards change has disabled our efforts to be the pioneering voice we once were. We exist primarily for ourselves. If your operating budget exceeds your mission budget you are inward focused. Jesus calls us to go out in to the world and make Disciples.

Have we abandoned this work? I hear "I love your ideas but we don't have any money." as much as I hear "We need to do something." What are we going to do? The angry, punker inside me demands more for this community I have aligned myself with.

You promised to walk with me in community and support when I took my vows of ordination. When I was baptized you as the church promised to raise me in the ways of Christ. I am weary of the inward focus. Who will stand up and be evangelized by the Millennials? Who will answer the call to receive the missionaries from Gen X?

There is a better way to be "church" in this world. The brick and mortar spaces we lovingly tend to may be hedging us in. How do we liberate ourselves from yesterday that we may die and be born again for tomorrow?

Who will join the party? Our parents are out of town and there is a raging party set to go off! Who is going to be there? All are invited. All are welcome. You just have to show up, be willing to rage and clean up afterwards.

Watch What Happens

It's truly amazing to watch the Arab world struggling to throw its dictators out of power, one by one. Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, Bahrain, Palestine, Jordan, Yemen, Syria--this is what the Islamic concept of jihad is really about!

This all reminds me of the jihad we got to witness in the late 80's/early 90's across the Soviet Eastern Bloc, and then the USSR itself. One by one, people of every country stood up against those that oppressed them, as most often with the Arab countries, nonviolently (Libya right now is a grand exception), just taking to the streets (and even singing their resistance, in the Baltic states!), demanding an end to their oppressors' rule. Poland, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Czecheslovakia, Germany (yeah, Germany!, remember the dismantling of the Berlin Wall? stunning....), on and on through what is now 14 countries. The culmination of which happened 20 years ago this month.

Some other truly impressive things also happened in other parts of the world at the same time--Tienanmen Square (April through June 1989), and Mandela's release (2/11/90) among them--but oh my, do you remember the failed Communist coup 20 years ago? The Great Saint Gorbachev taken "on vacation" by hardliners, and the Russian people refusing absolutely to allow another October Revolution. Thousands of people, just people!, refusing to let this happen. Even in the face of such potential violence, as we're seeing today in the Arab world, it is always stunning to watch people choose what could very likely be death for most of them, over the status quo continuing.

The barricades in Moscow held, and Soviet soldiers jumped out of their tanks to join the crowds. Boris Yeltsin held the resistance together (remember Yeltsin? how fun was that, to have him and Bill Clinton in power at the same time!?), and in just three days the oppressors' back was broken. It brought me to tears in those undergraduate years, to watch in real time what I could only imagine when reading the likes of Dorothy Day, Mohandas Gandhi, and Martin King. As we get ready to unveil this new national memorial to King this weekend, all of this is so important to bring to mind as we speak.

To butcher a famous phrase here, all that evil needs to survive is for good people to do nothing. Well, here's another constant truth in my meager experience: all people are good, and if they just do something, evil cannot survive. It may only take three days. It may take three generations. But when it happens....well, as a Christian, I proclaim that I see God's kin(g)dom come to earth, again!; that the Justice and Love Jesus embodies is incarnated in the lives of those who make these courageous stands; that the Spirit that always, constantly hovers over the earth and moves where She will surprises us yet again when we commit to true Peace. Please come find me when these things happen, and let's celebrate together!

Rev. Dennis Teall-Fleming is a Licensed Minister for The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), and Pastor of Open Hearts Gathering, a Spirit-chew-all Experiment in Gastonia, NC.

Un-American in the Name of Jesus?

Un-American in the name of Jesus? By Christian Piatt (Originally printed in PULP)

I used to go to a lot of basketball games with my dad in Dallas. We have both been enthusiastic Mavericks fans for almost three decades, so you can imagine how excited I was when they won their first NBA championship this year.

YES!

Anyhow, before each game they go through the typical ritual of playing the Star Spangled Banner, and I would always stand up, face the flag and put my hand over my heart. But then a new announcer one year asked people to “please rise to honor God and America with the singing of our National Anthem.”

“That’s messed up,” I said.

“What?” said my dad, “They do the same thing every game.”

“Yeah but this new guy says that the Star Spangled Banner honors God,” I said, “but there’s nothing in the verse they sing at the games about God anywhere. It has nothing to do with God.”

My dad grumbled something about my lack of patriotism and turned back toward the flag. But ever since, that moment has stood out in my mind as a perfect example of one of my biggest annoyances with American culture: our tendency to comingle a Christian identity with national patriotism.

So I was particularly interested to hear that Goshen College, a relatively small Mennonite school in Indiana, had decided to no longer play the National Anthem before any sporting events sponsored by the college. The reasoning, offered in a public statement issued by the college, was as follows:

“Historically, playing the national anthem has not been among Goshen College’s practices because of our Christ-centered core value of compassionate peacemaking seeming to be in conflict with the anthem’s militaristic language.”

Unsurprisingly, the decision caused a ruckus, especially once news outlets such as Fox Radio got hold of it. But even local city councilmen decried the move, suggesting that those in charge were violating “the American way,” and should relocate to somewhere like Cuba or Iran for a while until they learned to appreciate what they have here at home.

I posted a link to this news story on my Facebook page and asked people to respond. Following are a handful of comments from the many I received:

“It’s such a hard issue because the song is both a symbol and a song … I agree with the college that it isn’t a very Christian tune. It is about war. However, to ban it is, I fear, short-sighted. The song is a symbol of American unity. To ban it risks saying ‘we don’t want to be a part of the nation.’ I’m not sure that’s what they want to say.” (From a lawyer)

“I support the ban, the choice and the school’s right to make their own decision independent of the city council or any other political body.” (From a minister)

Ashley Quinn: “I wonder where the whole tradition of the anthem at sporting events started anyways. Probably something to do with the whole combative, competitive nature of many sports. I don’t think it makes any sense for a group of people devoted to peacemaking to sing it before they do anything.” (From a bartender)

Carl Gregg: “For anyone who watched the Super Bowl, there is a breathtaking mix of sports, nationalism, and military imagery. Ultimately, Christianity is trans-national, seeking to build the Beloved Community irrespective of national borders. The school is making one small step against the massive idolatry that is ubiquitous in our society of putting biological family and nation before God.” (From another minister)

“In the article I noticed people calling this anti-American. I don’t see it that way at all. Americans are at our very best when we are tolerant of others. You know, that whole ‘land of the free’ verse.” (From a retired Marine)

I’ll gladly concede that my circle for friends doesn’t represent the full socio-political spectrum, but I found the comments generally encouraging. For most of my life, it’s been sold to me that being a good Christian also meant supporting our country, wars, death penalty and all. But I think we’d be doing both our faith and our patriotism a favor if we made clear in our own minds that not everyone who is a Christian, as grateful as we may be for the freedom we’re afforded here, agrees morally with how we got here.

Christian is the creator and editor of the BANNED QUESTIONS book series, which include BANNED QUESTIONS ABOUT THE BIBLE and BANNED QUESTIONS ABOUT JESUS. He co-created and co-edits the “WTF: Where’s the Faith?” young adult series with Chalice Press, and he has a memoir on faith, family and parenting being published in early 2012 called PREGMANCY: A Dad, a Little Dude and a Due Date.

For more information about Christian, visit www.christianpiatt.com, or find him on Twitter or Facebook.

RECLAIMING EDEN

(a continuation and extension of)(RECLAIMING EXODUS)

The story of the Garden of Eden is an Exodus story. It is the first Exodus story and the story that arches over and encompasses and undergirds the rest of the Bible. Like any Exodus story, it is a story of God providing deliverance from bondage and the ensuing roundabout journey into the freedom of the wilderness where we have a continuous opportunity to discover God and to experience God and to learn how to be in relationship with God and through that relationship be resurrected and transformed into the here-and-now Kingdom of God.

God created this chaotic universe because God wanted free-willed life. Without the power to say "no", there is no free-will. Within the confines of the Garden of Eden story; if Adam and Eve do not defy God, if they do not say "no" to the limitations imposed by God, they will not have free-will and the Garden of Eden will not be a utopia, it will become a zoo, a gilded cage - a life without freedom, a life without hope, a life without a future - a place of bondage. Instead, by defying God, the Garden of Eden becomes an incubator and a proving ground. Being driven from the Garden of Eden into a stark wilderness is not a punishment, it is an Exodus. Like any Exodus, it is a roundabout journey away from bondage (and a place to which God never wants us to return) into the freedom of the wilderness where Adam and Eve and all the people of the Bible and all of us are to discover God and learn how to be in relationship with God and, ultimately, how to be - here and now - a community of love and grace, of equality and inclusion, of healing and justice as restoration - how to be the Kingdom of God. The story of the Garden of Eden is not a story of failure, it is a story of success for God and us; it is not a story of condemnation, it is a story of affirmation. Free-will would be meaningless if God did not expect to be surprised by us.

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Doug is a member of Central Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 4950 East Wabash Avenue, P.O. Box 3125, Terre Haute, IN 47803-0125 (812-877-9959). Central Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) is an open and affirming congregation where Doug has served as Elder and Treasurer and enjoys his continuing membership in the choir as the lowest voiced bass. For 2011-2012, Doug is an at-large member of the Indiana Disciples of Christ Regional Board. He graduated in 2009 with a M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from Indiana State University and a BS in Management Information Systems from Ball State University in 1997. Since August 2005, he has been a member of the CIS Adjunct Faculty at the Terre Haute campus of Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana. He has been published in DisciplesWorld and Encounter: Education for Meaning and Social Justice. In the summer of 2010, Doug became a contributor to [D]mergent. Of the 11 articles he has written, 5 are in the top 10 all-time most-viewed articles at [D]mergent. Doug is married to Carol, a First Grade teacher, and is the father of two sons. Jason is a professional musician (oboe, flute, English horn, and piccolo) who is working on a Master's degree and licensure in Special Education.

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The previous [D]mergent articles by Doug Sloan are listed here in order of publication: ..........RECLAIMING CHURCH ..........GOD IS... ..........RECLAIMING GOD ..........RECLAIMING MIRACLES ..........RECLAIMING NOT ..........RECLAIMING the GOOD NEWS - an epistle ..........RECLAIMING FORGIVENESS - it's personal ..........REFORMATION II ..........GOD IS - an update ..........RECLAIMING SCRIPTURE ..........RECLAIMING EXODUS

RECLAIMING EXODUS

Exodus is not punishment. Exodus is deliverance from bondage and slavery. Exodus is a journey during which we have a direct experience of God providing deliverance. Exodus is a journey by the roundabout way to wilderness. Through Exodus, we leave behind a life of domination and enslavement, a life without freedom, a life without hope, a life without a future. Exodus is a journey from one desert to a very different desert - from a civilized and even opulent desert of slavery, ignorance, tight limitations and empire ruled by a dominating exclusive elite to a stark desert wilderness of freedom, learning, choice and community ruled by equality and inclusion. By taking only the bare essentials into the wilderness, we leave behind that which held us in bondage. Exodus takes the roundabout path to avoid conflicts for which we are not ready, conflicts which we would unavoidably lose, conflicts which would yield despair and drive us back into bondage. The least important purpose of Exodus is escape. The most important purpose of Exodus is learning to live in constant relationship with God and through that relationship be resurrected and transformed and become - here and now - the kingdom of God. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Doug is a member of Central Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 4950 East Wabash Avenue, P.O. Box 3125, Terre Haute, IN 47803-0125 (812-877-9959). Central Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) is an open and affirming congregation where Doug has served as Elder and Treasurer and enjoys his continuing membership in the choir as the lowest voiced bass. For 2011-2012, Doug is an At-Large member of the Indiana Disciples of Christ Regional Board. He graduated in 2009 with a M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from Indiana State University and a BS in Management Information Systems from Ball State University in 1997. Since August 2005, he has been a member of the CIS Adjunct Faculty at the Terre Haute campus of Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana. He has been published in DisciplesWorld and Encounter: Education for Meaning and Social Justice. In the summer of 2010, Doug became a contributor to [D]mergent. Of the 9 articles he has written, 5 are in the top 10 all-time most-viewed articles at [D]mergent. Doug is married to Carol, a First Grade teacher, and is the father of two sons. Jason is a professional musician (oboe, flute, English horn, and piccolo) who is working on a Master's degree and licensure in Special Education.

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The previous [D]mergent articles by Doug Sloan are listed here in order of publication: ..........RECLAIMING CHURCH ..........GOD IS... ..........RECLAIMING GOD ..........RECLAIMING MIRACLES ..........RECLAIMING NOT ..........RECLAIMING the GOOD NEWS - an epistle ..........RECLAIMING FORGIVENESS - it's personal ..........REFORMATION II ..........GOD IS - an update ..........RECLAIMING SCRIPTURE

REFORMATION II

REFORMATION II

The Second Reformation Sunday, October 31, 2010 on the 493rd anniversary of the posting of the Thesis of Martin Luther

Reclaiming the Fundamentals of The Way

by Douglas C. Sloan

The Way is to...

* live the sacred life - here and now - of the one universal Good News message as the Kingdom of God.

* worship God, who has never been, at any time for any reason, a capricious God of death, war, murder, destruction, violence, abuse, vengeance, hate, fear, lies, slavery, systemic injustice, oppression, conditional acceptance, exclusion, segregation, discrimination, shunning, ostracism, eternal condemnation, eternal punishment, retribution, sacrifices, patriarchy, matriarchy, empire, nationalism, only one culture, only one race or portion of the population, parochialism, sectarianism, dogma, creeds, pledges, oaths or censorship – and who has never behaved as a Greco-Roman or narcissistic deity.

* worship God, who is singular, solitary, nonmaterial, immanent, transcendent – the sacred and ultimate reality, the divine mystery, the more – and who has always been a consistent God of life, peace, creation, truth, healing, rehabilitation, restoration, forgiveness, reconciliation, inclusion, participation, diversity, liberation, justice, resurrection, transformation, love and grace. There are neither multiple nor opposing divine forces or entities or identities or personalities. There is only God.

* know the grace of God to be unconditional and boundless – my acceptance by God requires nothing of me.

* know the love of God... .........to be unrelenting and unlimited; .........makes no exceptions and has no qualifications; .........to be the constant inviting presence of God; and .........to be the unconditional acceptance by God of me in my entirety as a gift.

* worship God, whose will is and who has always yearned for us to... .........be free and independent; .........think; .........be curious; .........be intelligent and wise; .........value knowledge over ignorance and compassion over knowledge; .........be creative; .........grow and mature; .........live long healthy satisfying lives; .........live non-violently without vengeance; .........be generous; .........be hospitable; .........be compassionate; .........do no harm; .........heal and rehabilitate and restore; .........forgive and reconcile and include all and have all participate; .........be good stewards of all resources; .........live here and now as one family; .........live in a loving intimate relationship with God; .........be transformed through resurrection; and .........be the kingdom of God.

* worship God, who has always been the same and whose character does not change and who is not capricious or abusive or narcissistic. God performs neither miracles nor acts of retribution. God neither saves nor condemns. God has never required and never accepted a sacrifice by anyone for any reason. God desires worship as relationship, not praise or euphoria. God does not preplan or predestine or interfere with the course or end of my life.

* reject as components or identifying characteristics or requirements of faith and worship and church and Christianity and life and God and Jesus and the Good News message and the Kingdom of God: death, war, murder, destruction, violence, abuse, vengeance, hate, fear, lies, slavery, systemic injustice, oppression, conditional acceptance, exclusion, segregation, discrimination, shunning, ostracism, eternal condemnation, eternal punishment, retribution, sacrifices, patriarchy, matriarchy, empire, nationalism, the superiority of one culture or one race or some portion of the population, parochialism, sectarianism, dogma, creeds, pledges, oaths, censorship, the valuation of thoughts or beliefs or praise or euphoria over justice and service and relationships, and any consideration of post-mortal existence.

* read scripture... .........as a sacrament for the experience and presence of God; .........for inspiration and motivation and contemplation and meditation and .........spiritual truth and insight and illumination about .........how God is a presence and influence in my life and .........to better understand the love and grace of God and .........to discern how God is calling me forward and .........beyond my previous understanding of God .........to a better and more complete and more mature understanding of God and .........how God is calling me forward .........to a more loving relationship with others and with God.

* know the best understanding of scripture requires... .........a scholarly knowledge of the original languages of the scripture and .........the linguistic devices used in the scripture .........(cultural assumptions, coded language, humor, sarcasm, hyperbole, .........poetic metaphor, etc.), .........of the cultural and historical environment in which the scripture was written, .........and .........of the people of that time by whom and for whom the scripture was written.

* know scripture as the metaphorical and narrative and thoughtful writings by the ancestors of my faith, who recorded their contemporary and historical, personal and cultural perception and understanding of the presence and influence of God in their lives and in the life of their community. While, at most, it can be persuasive or instructional, the scripture is not controlling.

* know the community of followers of The Way and worship and living the Good News message as the Kingdom of God to be more important than dogma and creeds and land and structures and debt and continuing expenses and material abundance and wealth accumulation and to be more important than pledges and oaths and empire and nationalism and patriotism and citizenship and civic religion and patriarchy and matriarchy and parochialism and sectarianism and political influence and social standing and financial clout.

* know largess to be more important than largeness and to hold that generosity and hospitality to all is a fundamental element of the Good News message and a defining characteristic of the Kingdom of God.

* know compassionate service to those who are hurt or lost or oppressed as a fundamental element of the Good News message and a defining characteristic of the Kingdom of God. Service requires partnership between the server and the served. Holy and wholesome service requires that the server be competent and healthy. Service is not slavery, not some form of enforceable servitude, and not an opportunity or a justification for the server to be oppressed or abused.

* know that as the children of God, we are one family in one place. There are no races, no tribes, no indigenous peoples, no ethnic groups, no castes, no nations, no royalty, no aristocracy, no social classes, no economic classes, no genders, no sexual orientations, no geography, no religions, no denominations, no sects, no churches, no elite, no privileged, no saved, no unsaved, no slaves, no outcasts, no untouchables – none of these are a consideration or a barrier or a limitation to the possession and development and utilization of time and effort and gifts and talents for service to others or participation in the Kingdom of God – there is no “us” and no “them”, no “here” and no “there”, no families other than the one family of all people together in one place as the children of God.

* know Jesus as: an intelligent compassionate Jewish mystic who had a strong persistent connection to and participation in and understanding of God; who could explain the reality of God to others and introduce them to a personal experience of God and a personal relationship with God; a messenger of the Good News and an example of the Kingdom of God. Because Jesus was effective as a messenger and successful as an example, he was killed. Both in message and self-understanding, Jesus was non-messianic and non-eschatological.

* know an experience of “the resurrected Jesus” or any other positive divine experience as an experience of the immediate and tangible presence of God, to know with confidence the reality of being and being in and of the Kingdom of God.

* not regard Jesus as divine or as a sacrifice or atonement or ransom or a substitute for me. The Good News message and the Kingdom of God and the presence and experience of God are what are divine in mortal life. Because of the love and grace of God, sacrifice and atonement and ransom and substitution on my behalf are not required for me to be accepted by God and to participate fully in and as the Kingdom of God.

* know the reemergence and revitalization of the disciples after the death of Jesus: ......–– as the first followers of The Way; ......–– as the first Good News resurrection and transformation; ......–– as the first example and witness that ......–– resurrection and transformation do exist and ......–– do not require death as a precedent; ......–– as example and witness that ......–– resurrection and transformation are available to all; and ......–– as example and witness that ......–– the Kingdom of God is here and now and active.

* know baptism, regardless of the method used, as a public act of private intent – to commit to living as a follower of the Good News message by being the Kingdom of God. Other followers are to provide the new follower with tolerance (ideally, acceptance) and the safety of time in a place devoid of condemnation and retribution which is necessary for the new follower to put behind and to put away a past life, to let the previous life die and in its place resurrect a new transformed life and person.

* know communion, regardless of the frequency it is shared or what elements are used, as a public act of universal unity. We gather at an open table where, without exception and without qualification, all are invited. At an open table, we celebrate and affirm the ever-present life of the Good News message and the ever-present all-inclusive unifying love of the Kingdom of God.

* proclaim “Jesus is Lord” and mean that I have no other Lord, that no person of any social or political or religious position has dominion over my life. To proclaim “Jesus is Lord” is to take a moral and spiritual stance and to commit an act of radical counter-cultural non-violent defiance of the oppression and systemic injustice committed by empire and civic religion and by individuals who are more interested in power over others than in service to others. My faith is personal. My faith is not a matter of proxy or the authority of others.

* know that the Good News message is not a loss of my freedom or independence, indeed, it is a much fuller realization of my freedom and independence; is not a forsaking of intelligence or wisdom or knowledge or the search for new knowledge or learning or finding new ways to see reality, or new insights into the workings and purposes of reality, or discovering or creating new visions of what reality could be; is not to forsake seeking or questioning or doubting or examination or reexamination or analysis or reanalysis. The Good News is dynamic, not static; is life, not death, not after death; is growth, not stunted development; is moving forward and moving beyond my current existence and is moving forward and moving beyond my current understanding of my existence and of God.

* be guided and instructed by the Good News message, which is: ......–– God is unconditional boundless grace and unlimited unrestrained love ......–– and always has been;

......–– God wants to have a loving intimate relationship with each of us ......–– without exception and without qualification;

......–– seek justice as healing and rehabilitation and restoration;

......–– seek universal reconciliation and inclusion and participation;

......–– in healthy partnership, ......–– compassionately serve all who are hurt or lost or oppressed;

......–– be generous and hospitable to all;

......–– live non-violently without vengeance and ......–– with a cheerful fearlessness of death and worldly powers; and

......–– be – here and now – the Kingdom of God.

Whatever we do – Whatever we are – Wherever we are – – can never separate us from the love and grace and the surrounding and inviting and welcoming and inclusive presence of God.

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REFORMATION II - letter size --- 8.5" x 11", 6 pages (appropriate size for copying and sharing)

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BIOGRAPHY Doug is a member of Central Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 4950 East Wabash Avenue, P.O. Box 3125, Terre Haute, IN 47803-0125 (812-877-9959). Central Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) is an open and affirming congregation where Doug has served as Elder and Treasurer and enjoys his continuing membership in the choir as the lowest voiced bass. He graduated in 2009 with a M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from Indiana State University and a BS in Management Information Systems from Ball State University in 1997. Since August 2005, he has been a member of the CIS Adjunct Faculty at the Terre Haute campus of Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana. He has been published in DisciplesWorld and Encounter: Education for Meaning and Social Justice. In the summer of 2010, Doug became a contributor to [D]mergent. Of the 7 articles he wrote, 5 are in the top 10 most-viewed articles at [D]mergent. Doug is married to Carol, a First Grade teacher, and is the father of two sons.

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STUDY RESOURCES To better understand the theology of Reformation II, please read the previous seven [D]mergent articles by Doug Sloan, listed here in order of publication: ..........RECLAIMING CHURCH ..........GOD IS... ..........RECLAIMING GOD ..........RECLAIMING MIRACLES ..........RECLAIMING NOT ..........RECLAIMING the GOOD NEWS - an epistle ..........RECLAIMING FORGIVENESS - it's personal

THESIS OF MARTIN LUTHER - in English