Disability

Pass the Ketchup Or How Emmaus Reminds us to Set an Open Table for All Ages and Abilities

By: J.C. Mitchell

Walking to Emmaus, are you?  I hope so. I think Luke purposely does not name Cleopas’s friend, so that everyone can put themselves in this Resurrection account.  Luke adds this Resurrection scene seven miles outside of Jerusalem; that is, just outside the center of power.  The witness is not one of the eleven, but one obviously in the know.  Now this story, which happens on the day of the Resurrection, is only written about by Luke, and I believe it is a perfect reminder of inclusion of all in communion: An Open Table, which is always important and a great way to remember it is Autism Acceptance & Awareness month this April.  

 It seems that the two walking along had different interpretations of the recent murder of Jesus and the news from the women.  The Greek suggests that they are in a debate throwing ideas back and forth.  I imagine it is emotional; maybe not quite as heated as Bernie supporters and Hillary supporters, but something like that.  Jesus arrives, and is not recognized by our inconsequential people, and explains everything from Moses to the events of that morning, and they/we still don’t get it.  I have had people ask me, “Why Luke did not record Jesus’ words about the Hebrew Scriptures?” and I reply,” That is exactly the point.”

Jesus is not interested in leaving us with more Scripture; Jesus leaves us with the Table.  This is exactly where I and Cleopas know Jesus, and that is truly amazing, for we may still have different interpretations, but we are united after this Resurrection moment revealed in the Breaking of the Bread, to go back to inform the eleven with authority. 

Currently my son who is non-conversational (talks only for basic needs) is offered Communion and only takes it when it is delicious bread.  Once I had to hide the Hawaiian Loaf that was brought in (by a congregant that refuses to use sourdough, because Jesus is Sweet not…).  The whole congregation said, “let him have some,” but I reminded them that I already said no (by the way, most of them are great-grandparents).  I will continue to bring him to Communion services in worship and at home, for this act of eating together is truly the act of community, thus I cannot limit it to simply the Table in the Church, or sanctified by such an institution, even when I am the clergy doing such a thing.  I find it seven miles outside with the sojourner or resident alien, not just my beloved liturgy. 

 For even if you were to hear the explanation of the Resurrection from Jesus Himself, you will still not get it; thus my son’s interpretation and experience at the Table is as valid as my own. For Jesus left a simple message, eat together and love one another, and both my son and I can do that well, and with anyone willing to pass the ketchup.  

"!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"

By J.C. Mitchell


Star Wars was all over social media yesterday.  I like Star Wars, I grew up with that story.   I am not a fanatic and while I know much about the first six, I have not pursued knowledge about this upcoming one.  I figure I will eventually see the movie, mostly because my lovely wife will make sure, and my friends on social media will make sure I know too much about VII, good and bad for the months to come.  


The one thing that did make me interested was a picture of an African-American boy dressed as a Jedi, and a tweet from @afroeccentrix reading “My little bro who is OBSESSED w/Star Wars now gets to see a more diverse cast on screen. #CelebrateStarWarsVII.” And this my friends, has made me more interested in the movie, for how powerful is it to see someone like one’s own self on the big screen as it will be for the boy in the picture.  This is just a movie, but it is also a powerful expression of our culture, our stories.


This is why my son will dress as Chewbacca this Halloween.  My son has limited verbal skills. Recently he has begun speaking two, sometimes three, word sentences without prompting, and also he communicates beyond words alone, just like his beloved Snoopy, Woodstock, and Curious George.  There are many other characters he likes, but these have become very special to him, and it is hard not to notice these famous characters do not use verbal communication, while at the same time they are included.  So we thought we should introduce our son to Chewbacca, and while he has not seen the movie, we got an inexpensive costume using a stocking cap which he will tolerate on his head instead of a mask. I am aware that Wookies like Chewbacca speak Shyriiwook, but how we experience it on screen, the communication reminds me of communication with one who knows basic language, as it is tone that seems to communicate more than Shyriiwook words.


So while the characters our son already loves are cartoon animals, Chewbacca comes from a whole society that speak in a very guttural sounds, and is honored by many.  


But all these role models have fur (or feathers).


I cannot wait to know the Jedi who does not speak. 

 

 


Revisiting Equal Marriage

By Rev. Mindi

Last fall, I wrote this article about equal marriage and how while we celebrate that gay and lesbian couples can now get married, we still have a long way to go for creating equal marriage, especially among those with disabilities, in which one partner often loses their benefits if they are legally married. I am posting it again, because while I rejoice in the SCOTUS decision on marriage on June 26th, 2015, we still have a long way to go.

 

 

http://dmergent.org/articles/2014/10/28/equal-marriage

Let us celebrate now that marriage for gay and lesbian couples is now legal in the United States, but may we continue to work for justice for all in regards to the freedom to marry.